Outdoor Garden Patio Furniture – Adirondack Chairs

Outdoor Garden Patio Furniture just wouldn’t be complete without a set of Adirondack Chairs.

The Adirondack Chairs has been around for many years but today’s Adirondack chairs were designed by Thomas Lee is 1903. While on vacation in Westport, New York in the Adirondack Mountains, he needed outdoor chairs for his summer holiday home. He tested his design on his family first before arriving at a final design. He offered the final design to Harry Bunnell, a friend of his who was in need of winter income. Bunnell quickly realised the potential of the Adirondack Chair and quickly, without Lee’s knowledge or permission, registered a patent on the design and produced commercially them for the next 20 years.

Today’s Adirondack Chairs normally features a rounded back and seat with the backrest tilted backwards for comfort. There are numerous designs available today and they keep changing. We have kept ours as close as possible to the original design due to the appearance of them and the large armrests.

Outdoor Garden Patio Furniture Adirondack Chair

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There is a range of timbers that can be used. Obviously the more durable and more expensive the timber the more the chairs will cost you. Saligna is widely used as an affordable fairly durable hardwood while top end users will request these in teak or balau. CCA Treated pine works well if treated to at least an H3 level which is suitable for outdoors and carries the manufacturers guarantee of up to 50 years. So they may even outlast the teak or balau.

The Adirondack Chair is slightly pricier than a normal outdoor garden patio chair because a lot of the pieces are curved and if one is not making use of a CNC router, then these invariably need to be cut by hand using either a band saw or jig saw and then shaped to their final shape. They are therefore quite labour intensive. A lot of companies have re-designed them slightly to avoid curved pieces and make use of straight cut pieces which speeds up cutting and assembly time. However we have stuck to the original curved pieces in order to keep our design as close as possible to the original. We also only produce them in timber obtained from sustainable forestry as we have found the plastic composites just don’t match up to a piece of solid wood.

Outdoor Garden Patio Furniture Adirondack Chair

Click to enlarge

The distinctive arm rests are larger enough to place a plate of food on with a drink on the other side. The backrest is tilted backwards and curved for comfort while the seat is contoured to fit around the legs.

We seal our Adirondack Chairs using a good quality outdoor timber preservative so that maintenance of them will be kept to a minimum. This requires no sanding and a mere clean and re-coat is all that is necessary. The timber preservative also allows the natural beauty of the timber to come through as opposed to a coating that covers that. They are also available in white-painted or any other colour really.

Other pieces are also available such as the double seater with table in the middle or without, a foot rest that is adjustable and a small side table all in the same style and design.

We don’t sell them as flat pack as we have found that flat pack will invariably break over time. Our chairs are made to last many years and I personally still have the first ones I made.

Outdoor Garden Patio Furniture Adirondack Chair

Click to enlarge

They are also available in children’s sizes as well as youth.

For a free no obligation quote on Adirondack Chairs and related outdoor garden patio furniture please complete the form below or contact us on 082 496 5444.

Lutyens Bench – Outdoor Garden Furniture

Outdoor garden furniture

Pictured is a bench with a curved centre backrest. The benches we now make have a straight piece as the centre back rest. The curved top backrest remains as pictured.

This was a lovely job to have received. A client found me on the internet and came across some of the outdoor furniture I was making. Before I started building wooden decks I made furniture, largely outdoor picnic tables, Adirondack chairs and the like. I think I’ve mentioned it before in this blog, but it is difficult to make a decent living making furniture in South Africa. The imports that exist nowadays are so cheap and unfortunately people almost always look at price before quality.

Nevertheless, I was approached by this client and commissioned to make this bench. Lutyens Bench is a bench that was designed and first built prior to 1913 by the Edwardian architect Sir Edwin Lutyens (the Dutch name is pronounced “Lut-chins”). They have since become very popular and are very distinctive in their design as can be seen.

The client brought me the plans which he had ordered online and they had been delivered to him in full size of scale 1:1. All of the pieces came as templates and they were cut out and the pieces of MDF then cut from them. I made a few templates for the curved pieces from supawood or MDF. MDF is easy to shape as it is relatively soft and can be worked quite easily. Once I had a template I rough cut my balau slightly larger than it needed to be and then clamped the templates to the work piece and ran a flush trim router bit over it. The flush trim router bit contains a bearing at the bottom which is in line with the cutting edge. So the bearing runs along the template beneath and the cutting edge cuts the work piece above to the same shape as the template. Multiple pieces can then be cut to the exact same shape.

Outdoor garden furniture

Pictured is a bench with a curved centre backrest. The benches we now make have a straight piece as the centre back rest. The curved top backrest remains as pictured.

Once I had all my pieces cut I used a domino machine from Festool. The plans indicated dowel joints but after buying my Domino Machine years ago I don’t use anything else. A Domino Machine works in a similar way to a biscuit jointer but it cuts a long straight hole rather than the traditional round hole that the biscuit jointer cuts. A Domino made from birch is then inserted into the hole and it produces a mortise and tenon joint that is both strong an easy to cut. The birch expands slightly with the moisture of the glue so the domino fits tightly in the hole. They have grooves to allow the excess glue to squeeze out and are slightly shorter than the hole to allow them to be inserted completely. A very clever machine from Festool I must say and I am surprised that other manufacturers haven’t copied it.

The pieces went together quite well but I did battle on a few of them where I couldn’t use the Domino machine so had to use epoxy as my glue and a nail gun to hold then in place. I bumped into the client years later and the bench was still in one piece so my method must have worked.

Outdoor garden furniture

Pictured is a bench with a curved centre backrest. The benches we now make have a straight piece as the centre back rest. The curved top backrest remains as pictured.

I finished it with an outdoor timber preservative. I chose balau as my timber because it was to live outdoors and the balau holds up very well to the weather in Africa. The client had built the area you see in the picture especially for this bench. It took me a while to leave after delivering it because it all seemed to fit so perfectly together in the setting they had chosen in the garden.

For a free no obligation quote on outdoor furniture or any other timber work that you require please complete the form below and I will get in touch with you.  Or you can call us on 082 496 5444.